“When you can take someone by the hand and help them navigate the huge world of symphonic, operatic, chamber, or solo music, it opens a whole new world to explore.”

Johanna Lundy is a recipient of a 2017 Artist Research & Development Grant.

Artist Research and Development Grants are designed to support the advancement of artistic research, aid in the development of artistic work and recognize the contributions individual artists make to Arizona’s communities. For more information about the Artist Research & Development Grant, click here.

Lundy will create a recording of solo music for horn and perform several coordinated outreach concerts across Arizona. The project will contribute much-needed recordings to the brass world, including two brand new works by Arizona composers. It will provide a platform to share contemporary music with audiences in a way that draws them in. Concerts will take place April – August 2017 in Tucson, Phoenix, Bisbee, and other areas of Arizona. Recording and mastering will take place July – December 2017. The recording will be released digitally in spring 2018.

By bringing contemporary music to small audiences in approachable settings and outreach programs, the project aims to increase interest in contemporary music and classical music at large.

“As I have learned from many years teaching music in the classroom, the key to engagement (audience or otherwise) is participation,” said Lundy. “I believe this is one of the main reasons why people shy away from traditional classical music concerts. Requiring audience members to sit for hours without moving is uncomfortable! It restricts them from fully experiencing the music.”

 

Johanna Lundy is the principal horn of the Tucson Symphony, a position she has held since 2006. She has received critical acclaim for her “robust sound” and her “breathtaking” and “extraordinary” performances. The Green Valley News hailed her Tucson Symphony solo debut as “the highest level of professional musicianship. Every attack was pure, controlled and perfect. [Lundy] left the audience in a state of near-euphoria.”

Since moving to Arizona, Lundy has performed extensively throughout the state, performing regularly with the Phoenix Symphony and Arizona Opera. In fall 2010, she was named one of Tucson’s 40 under 40 by the Arizona Daily Star. As a soloist and recitalist, Lundy has appeared with the Tucson Symphony, the Arizona Symphonic Winds, the Tucson Chamber Artists, the University of Arizona Guest Artist Series, the Sierra Vista Symphony and the St. Andrew’s Bach Society. For seven seasons, Lundy served as the principal horn of the Des Moines Metro Opera Orchestra. For three years, she participated in the prestigious Lucerne Festival Academy in Switzerland, under conductor and composer Pierre Boulez.

Before joining the TSO, Lundy was an active freelancer in the Boston area, performing with the Albany and New Hampshire Symphonies and the Boston Philharmonic, among others. Lundy attended the Aspen Music Festival as a fellowship recipient for five summers, where she appeared as soloist in 2005.

Lundy currently maintains a private teaching studio in Tucson and has served on the faculty at Pima Community College. In the 2007-08 season, she joined the faculty at the University of Arizona as a guest lecturer in horn.

She holds a Bachelor of Music from the Oberlin Conservatory and a Master of Music from the New England Conservatory and principal teachers include James Sommerville, Richard Sebring, Roland Pandolfi, John Zirbel and Richard Deane.

Photo by Erin Clendenin

 

Perspectives: Johanna Lundy

Perspectives is an on ongoing series of interviews and check-ins with recipients of our Artist Research and Development Grant (ARDG). Today we speak with 2017 ARDG recipient Johanna Lundy of Tucson.

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Banner images (from left to right): Photo of horn by Sadie Hernandez, (cc) 2010. Photo of Johanna Lundy by Erin Clendenin.




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